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Heavy-Hitting MS Therapies Now Being Used Sooner for Some Patients

January 24, 2018

Five treatments currently are in the mAbs class: OcrevusLemtradaRituxanTysabri, and Zinbryta. (Rituxan isn’t approved as an MS treatment in the United States. Nonetheless, it’s being prescribed off-label by some neurologists.) Until recently, these mAb therapies weren’t usually prescribed as the first treatments for someone newly diagnosed with MS — one or two other disease-modifying treatments (DMT) were tried first. Two reasons appear to explain this. First, some patients and neurologists were concerned about the level of risk with these therapies. Second, some insurance companies and government health plans weren’t happy with their cost.

Costs

However, a recent audit of patients and neurologists by Spherix Global Insights, a business intelligence and market research company, reports an apparent change in attitude about cost:

“While neurologists report payers being at least somewhat restrictive during the current DMT selection process, only 28% of mAb DMT-treated patients were required to step through prior therapies before obtaining access to their current DMT. This finding suggests that payer-influenced treatment sequencing may not be a substantial barrier to increased use of mAb DMTs as induction therapy (the first treatment prescribed) in appropriate candidates.”

Risk Vs. Benefit

A similar attitude change seems to have taken place regarding risk versus benefit. The report suggests that neurologists are increasingly prescribing certain monoclonal antibody therapies for their patients even though they may feel, as a group, that mAbs pose a risk. According to the report, neurologists believe that, for certain patients, the high-efficacy benefit of a specific mAbs made its risk “acceptable.”

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